Real-Life Benefits of Exercise and Physical Activity – National Institute on Aging

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Exercise and physical activity are good for just about everyone, including older adults. No matter your health and physical abilities, you can gain a lot by staying active. In fact, studies show that “taking it easy” is risky. Often, inactivity is more to blame than age when older people lose the ability to do things on their own. Lack of physical activity also can lead to more visits to the doctor, more hospitalizations, and more use of medicines for a variety of illnesses.

Including all 4 types of exercise can benefit a wide range of areas of your life. Staying active can help you:
Being active can help prevent future falls and fractures. For tips to help prevent falls at home, read Fall-Proofing Your Home.
The YMCA offers evidence-based group exercise programs for older adults to improve fitness and balance for falls prevention.
Research has shown that exercise is not only good for your physical health, it also supports emotional and mental health. You can exercise with a friend and get the added benefit of emotional support. So, next time you’re feeling down, anxious, or stressed, try to get up and start moving!
Physical activity can help:
In addition, exercise and physical activity may possibly improve or maintain some aspects of cognitive function, such as your ability to shift quickly between tasks, plan an activity, and ignore irrelevant information.
Here are some exercise ideas to help you lift your mood:

Read about this topic in Spanish. Lea sobre este tema en español.
YMCA
800-872-9622
fulfillment@ymca.net
www.ymca.net
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
800-232-4636
888-232-6348 (TTY)
cdcinfo@cdc.gov
www.cdc.gov
MedlinePlus
NIH National Library of Medicine      
www.medlineplus.gov
This content is provided by the NIH National Institute on Aging (NIA). NIA scientists and other experts review this content to ensure it is accurate and up to date.
Content reviewed: April 03, 2020

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