Baby boomers benefit from strength training – MSU Extension – Michigan State University

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Leatta Byrd,
See what increased physical activity can do for you.
Baby boomers are hitting the gym doing strength training which can make bones stronger, one major benefit. Experts suggest that lifting weights twice (for beginners) or three times a week increases strength by building muscle mass and bone density. Michigan State University Extension recommends people continue to be physically active as they age. According to WebMD people 50 and over are purchasing gym and health club memberships and more fitness centers are doing everything they can to attract the baby boom generation and it’s working, with folks over 50 making up the fastest-growing segment of the fitness population.
Older people realize that if they want to age successfully and remain living independently they need to have strong muscles and bones that will maintain agility, strength and balance. Seniors can get this level of fitness through incorporating strength training into their physical activity. There are a few tips which will help beginners with a strength training program. The key benefits to strength training according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention for those who suffer with chronic disease:
Having strong bones are key to healthy aging. By taking care of your bone health you can have a positive outcome on your health now and prolong independence as you age. Before engaging in strength training you should first consult your medical doctor.
This article was published by Michigan State University Extension. For more information, visit https://extension.msu.edu. To have a digest of information delivered straight to your email inbox, visit https://extension.msu.edu/newsletters. To contact an expert in your area, visit https://extension.msu.edu/experts, or call 888-MSUE4MI (888-678-3464).
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